HUMANS OF THE PFISTER | FEBRUARY 2017 | “First Loves” Edition | Throwing Rocks at Joey

My first love was in 4th grade.  His name was Joey, and I used to throw rocks at him to get his attention.  He was from the nicer side of the tracks than me (we grew up in Latonia, Kentucky, which is now Covington).  Joey was blue-eyed and had the house and the nice family.  But in 5th grade, I moved away.  Fast forward to high school, when Joey was the basketball star.  I had just moved back to Latonia and we got back together.  I threw a rock at him and he said, “I know you!”  So in high school, we were going out for a little bit–and then I moved away again, from ’76-’89!  When I returned, I “ran into him.” Actually, what happened is that I called a friend of mine and asked her how to track this guy down.  Fortunately, he was separated.  We got back together . . . and then he went back to his wife.  Then I left again.  I was always leaving . . .

After our conversation, Kathy and I trolled Joey on Facebook for a little bit. There were many guys with his first and last name, as can be imagined. Some of Kathy’s comments included “No way he’d make the Navy” (after finding a Joey who’s in the Navy) and “There’s no way he’d be a pastor.”  Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Author: Dominic Inouye

As a teacher for over twenty years, Dominic Inouye has worked with everyone from elementary school students to adult learners, creative writers and physical therapists, to help them develop their reading, writing, critical thinking, and, most of all, their voices.  He began his career at Marquette University, expecting to become the next Mr. Keating from Dead Poets Society, then made a surprise move to the high school classroom, where he found his home at Pius XI High School, then later at The Prairie School in Wind Point, Wisconsin, where he is completing his seventh and final year as an English teacher. Never one to pull an old lesson plan out of a dusty file cabinet and re-use it year after year, Inouye began experimenting from the very beginning with how to integrate authentic, real-world, transformative learning into his students’ study of literature and the expression of ideas.  Examples include his founding of the Milwaukee Spotlight Student Film Festival, the C.L.A.S.S. program, which brings together 4th-12th graders for service learning, and the Senior Capstone program of individualized research projects.  As expected, Inouye will not be bringing any dusty ideas to the Pfister--only creative celebrations of new voices. Inouye was chosen to serve as the hotel’s ninth Pfister Narrator based on his writing style, his vision for the role, and his personality.